Pop Tarts – Two Ways – Whole Wheat or Gluten-Free

What’s the difference between white wheat flour and whole wheat flour?

White wheat flour is ground from hard white wheat. Whole wheat flour is ground from red hard wheat.

White wheat flour (hard white wheat) contains a bit less gluten and a little less protein than whole wheat flour (hard red wheat). So if you bake with white wheat flour, the resulting bread, muffin, or cookie will be a bit less dense than if you bake it with whole wheat flour.

What about whole wheat pastry flour? Whole wheat pastry flour is ground from soft white wheat. This flour has less gluten and less protein than the first two wheats mentioned and will give a much lighter and tender crumb than white wheat flour or whole wheat flour.

Can these flours be used interchangeably? In my experience, no. If you try to trade out whole wheat pastry flour for white wheat flour, your end result will be much tougher and not as light as intended.

Which flour should you reach for while baking? In my opinion, if you’re baking a loaf of bread – go with the whole wheat flour. If you’re making pizza crust, crackers, or something with a bit more substance – go with the white wheat flour. If you’re baking a cake or muffins – use the whole wheat pastry flour.

Why do I mix the flours in my recipes at times? I do this because I’m trying to achieve a certain texture just one flour can’t give me. If you change out the flours called for in the recipe, you’ll get a different texture than intended.

So on to the pop tarts! I’ve given you two different versions here. One whole wheat and one gluten free. They’re incredibly fun to make with kids and can be filled with dozens of sweet things – jam, jelly, marmalade, homemade nutella, chocolate, fruit, etc.

Kids love’em but so do adults. How fun would these be piled on a large platter at the end of a long dinner? Add coffee with whipped cream and honey, and you have a delightful end to your meal.

Apricot Almond Pop Tarts (Gluten-Free)

Serving Size: Makes about twelve - 4" x 2 1/2" tarts

Apricot Almond Pop Tarts (Gluten-Free)

If you'd like to make a grain-free version of these pastries, use this dough recipe.

Ingredients

    For the crust:

  • 1 1/2 cups gluten free flour mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill)

  • 1 cup brown rice flour

  • 1/2 cup oat flour (make sure it's gluten free)

  • 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin (I prefer Bernard Jensen gelatin)

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt

  • 1 cup (16 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cold, cut into tablespoons
  • For the Filling:

  • 3/4 cup apricot preserves

  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water (if you are egg-free, you can use water to bind the dough)

Instructions

Place gluten free flour mix, rice flour, oat flour, gelatin and sea salt in a food processor. Pulse a few times to combine. Add butter and pulse until it looks like wet sand, about 8 (1-second) pulses. Add 10 tablespoons of ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse after each addition. Pulse until dough gathers into large clumps. The dough should not be crumbly. If it is, add a tablespoon or two of water. Divide dough into two portions and wrap plastic wrap around each piece, pressing firmly to form into a disk. Refrigerate 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350ºF and adjust rack to middle position. Remove 1 disk of dough from the refrigerator place on a floured surface. Roll it into a large rectangle about 1/8" thick. Cut out rectangles that are 4-inch x 2 1/2 inch. (I used a rectangle cookie cutter for this step.) Place half of the rectangles on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the egg wash over the entire surface of each piece of dough (This helps seal the filling inside. Again, if you're egg-free then use water to seal the dough). Place a heaping tablespoon of filling in the center of each rectangle, keeping about 1/2-inch perimeter. Place a second piece of dough on top of the first and gently press around the pocket filing, sealing the dough. Using a fork, press the tines around the edge of the tart. Repeat with remaining tarts. After all tarts are assembled, brush each with egg wash. Bake for 25 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool for 10 minutes before serving. Repeat process with second disk of dough.

Storage:

The tarts will keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 days. To reheat, place in a 350ºF oven for 10 minutes. The pop tarts can also be frozen. To reheat, place on a baking sheet in a 350ºF oven for 20 minutes.

Apricot Almond Pop Tarts (Whole Wheat)

Serving Size: Makes about 12 - 4" x 2 1/2" tarts

Apricot Almond Pop Tarts (Whole Wheat)

Ingredients

    For the dough:

  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour

  • 1 cup brown rice flour, plus 2 tablespoons

  • 1/4 cup arrowroot flour, plus 2 tablespoons

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons coarse sea salt

  • 1 cup plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold
10 tablespoons ice water
  • For the filling:

  • 3/4 cup apricot preserves

  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water (if you're egg-free you can use water to bind the dough)

Instructions

Place pastry flour, brown rice flour, arrowroot flour, and salt in a food processor. Pulse a few times to combine. Add butter and pulse until it looks like wet sand, about 8 (1-second) pulses. Add 10 tablespoons of ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse after each addition. Pulse until dough gathers into larger clumps. The dough should not be crumbly. If it is, add a tablespoon or two of water. Divide dough into 2 portions and wrap plastic wrap around each piece, pressing firmly to form into a disk. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350ºF and adjust rack to middle position. Remove 1 disk of dough from the refrigerator place on a floured surface. Roll it into a rectangle about 1/8" thick. Cut rectangles that are 4-inch x 2 1/2 inch. (I used a rectangle cookie cutter for this step.) Place half of the rectangles on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the egg wash over the entire surface of each piece of dough (This helps seal the filling inside. Again, if you're egg-free then use water to seal the dough). Place a heaping tablespoon of filling in the center of each rectangle, keeping about 1/2-inch perimeter. Place a second piece of dough on top of the first and gently press around the pocket filing, sealing the dough. Using a fork, press the tines around the edge of the tart. Repeat with remaining tarts. After all tarts are assembled, brush each with egg wash. Bake for 25 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool for 10 minutes before serving. Repeat process with second disk of dough.

Storage:

The tarts will keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 days. To reheat, place in a 350ºF oven for 10 minutes. The pop tarts can also be frozen. To reheat, place on a baking sheet in a 350ºF oven for 20 minutes.

This post is linked to Simple Lives Thursday

Posts may contain affiliate links. If you purchase a product through an affiliate link, your costs will be the same but Deliciously Organic will receive a small commission. This helps cover some of the costs for this site. We appreciate your support!

 

Like It? Share it!

Did you enjoy this post?

Sign up for FREE updates!

Receive my "Top 7 Tips to Reduce Inflammation" when you subscribe!

114 Comments

  1. I grind my own wheat for whole wheat flour, and my grinder has a pastry flour setting, which is what I normally keep it set at. I grind hard red wheat berries and my flour is almost identical to the whole wheat pastry flour I’ve bought in the past, and performs better in baked goods. I always assumed this was because it was fresh and all the nutrients were still intact. My fresh flour does feel “softer” while the off-the-shelf stuff seems drier. Great recipe! Will have to give it a go when my apples are ready for picking. I make an “apple pie on a stick” that is a very similar type of pastry, but I use an oil pie crust instead. Butter has never worked well for me!

    • Deliciously Organic

      Very interesting! I agree that fresh flour tastes so much better. I started grinding my grain about 5 years ago and I’d never go back! Your apple pie on a stick sounds fabulous!

  2. Renee H.

    These look delicious! And I’m very excited about the homemade nutella. My son has allergies and feeding problems and that’s one of the things he’ll actually eat. I can’t wait! Thanks Carrie!

    • Deliciously Organic

      I completely understand. I can’t tell you how many bad pancakes, muffins, cakes I’ve had to throw away while figuring out how to bake things without white flour. I hope to provide good recipes on my site to take the leg-work out for everyone else! :)

  3. What a great post! I don’t know much about flour and always wonder what the difference between them all is. I’m not much of a baker, maybe it’s my lack of patience :) But I tell ya, if I could bake, I would be making these pop tarts from scratch. They look amazing!!! My kids would think I’m a rockstar!

  4. DG

    These look great! I have 2 questions: First, can I use something besides gelatin? I ask because I am a vegetarian. Next, I can’t for the life of me find gluten-free oat flour–can I use a different gf flour? I’d really like to make these for me and my little girl! Thanks!

    • Deliciously Organic

      I chose gelatin to stay away from any gums, but you could try replacing it with xanthan gum. I haven’t tested it, but it should work well. You could use sorghum as a replacement for the oat flour (it will have a stronger flavor than the original recipe so you might want to add a tablespoon or two of whole cane sugar).

      I grind my own oats for flour but Amazon also has oat flour on their “Subscribe and Save” program. I live in a remote area so I buy many of those harder-to-find ingredients this way. http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Gluten-22-Ounce/dp/B003LPKETS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312985643&sr=8-1

      • DG

        Thanks for the information! I will try using xanthan gum as a replacement. When you say you grind your own oats, what kind of oats? I have gluten-free rolled oats and gluten-free steel cut oats. Will either of those work? Otherwise, I’ll try the sorghum flour.

        Thanks again!

  5. Liz

    My gluten free and dairy allergic son started jumping up and down and shouting “awesome, awesome” when he saw these photos! Pop-tops were on the no list before the allergies and celiac, but sometimes made it in the house anyhow..He has missed these, thanks for the recipe.

  6. Karen

    Wohoo! My son has been on a gluten free, reduced sugar diet for a few months. He has cravings for certain things once in a while. Cookies, cakes, poptarts…He is going to love these! I will use reduced sugar preserves or make my own with stevia. Yehaw! Love everything I’ve made from this site. Awesome!

    Question – do I have to buy “rice flour”? or is it just ground brown rice? can I grind brown rice in a coffee grinder? Just curious :) I’ve groud oats in it and it works well but takes time if needing a lot ;o).

    • Deliciously Organic

      I’m so glad to hear your son can have a treat he’s missed! That makes my day. :)

      Yes, you need to buy rice flour. Brown rice flour is just brown rice ground up, but it needs to be a very fine grind to work and a coffee grinder won’t be able to do it. Rice flour is pretty cheap and can be found at your local health food store or at most asian markets.

    • Deliciously Organic

      Unfortunately, it’s not so cut-and-dry. If you’re making a cake or muffins then replace 1 cup white flour with 1 1/4 cups whole wheat pastry flour. If you’re making bread, I’d do 1/2 whole wheat and 1/2 white wheat. As you saw with my pie dough from this recipe I used a bit of rice and arrowroot flour – this was because just whole wheat flour wasn’t giving the crust that flakiness I was going for. The most difficult is cookies. Whole wheat pastry flour will make the cookies run all over the pan and whole wheat flour will make them hard as rocks. For cookies I use a combination of flours and my whole wheat chocolate chip cookie recipe can be found in my cookbook.

      Over the next two months I will be posting lots of basic whole wheat and gluten free recipes. Such as muffins, cake, etc. I think this will help everyone so they can have a basic recipe to use and then variate how they like.

  7. Cathy B.

    These look so yummy! I have two questions before I try them. First, is there a difference between arrowroot and arrowroot flour? Second, could you use a grain mill to grind rice into flour? You mentioned in a comment that a coffee grinder wouldn’t work, but I grind wheat with my grain mill and I wonder if I could just throw in some rice instead of buying rice flour. Thanks so much for sharing your expertise!

  8. Keri

    Just made these. They are amazing! I even goofed them up because I thought I turned the oven on Bake and 350 degrees but instead I turned it on Broil. Oops!
    I figured it out 12-13 minutes into cooking because I smelled something burning. The edges were a little burnt but they still tasted incredible. I’m glad though because that was only half of the dough. I will have the oven right when I make the other half.

  9. Keri

    OK, Now I am wondering if there was something to the Broil and 350 degrees that I accidentally cooked these at the first time. I just cooked the second batch and made sure I had it right this time, Bake and 350 degrees and cooked them for 25 minutes and they weren’t as flaky and crispy as the first batch so I turned the oven to Broil and 350 degrees and cooked for another 10 minutes and Voila! perfect texture! Yea!!!

  10. Valerie

    I have a ton of fresh peaches just begging to be made into peach spread for pop-tarts. I noticed, however, that this recipe calls for arrowroot flour, but your galette crust calls for tapioca starch. Is there any difference in the final product or can you use them interchangeably for the crust? I am out of arrowroot but have plenty of tapioca starch and would love to make these soon. Thanks!

  11. Tomi Moore

    Hello Carrie,
    I just wanted to say i am so excited to try these! i haven’t eaten a poptart in 5 years. I have never seen arrowroot flour at my local stores. I will be trying tapioca starch, and will happily let you know how they turn out. We just bought a grain mill and I found your website while looking for recipes that are written for fresh ground flours. What I found was homemade creamer(!), pop tarts(!) and hamburger buns.
    I also wanted to thank you for being so willing and glad to help others in this way, even to email someone personally, just to help them! Last I want to thank you in advance for making a recipe for nutella. My family will benefit from your work and heart. We aren’t eating organic, but we have planted a garden, and Lord willing, will work towards better foods.
    thank you Carrie,
    Tomi Moore

  12. Bonnie

    I am so excited to try to make these! My son is 4 and he has never been able to have a pop tart since he was diagnosed at the age of 1. His friends at school eat them sometimes and he has asked me numerious times if he could just try one. It breaks my heart to constantly tell him no and tell him there is gluten in it. He is going to be so happy!! Thank you!!!

  13. Jen

    Hi, I love the sound of this recipe! I’m also super excited to try your homemade coffee creamer! I really want to bake these poptarts and send them to my boyfriend in the mail. Any ideas of how to keep them fresh for that? I’d love some advice. Thanks!

    • Deliciously Organic

      Since they are pastries, they might crumble from being transported. I would wrap them each in parchment paper and plastic wrap and then pack the box tightly. I’m bet he will love them crumbly or not! :)

  14. JoyAnn

    I was wondering if the tapioca starch worked for this recipe… I don’t see any updates on whether it worked or for any of the substitutions that people may have tried.

  15. Deliciously Organic

    There is an unprocessed whole wheat flour called “white wheat flour” that is from hard white wheat. It is an unprocessed flour that has recently gained popularity. Bob’s Red Mill carries it, among other companies. It is a whole grain flour stone ground from the entire wheat berry, it contains all the nutrients from the bran, germ and fiber of the endosperm. Here is a link explaining the exact flour I wrote about in this post: http://www.vitacost.com/bobs-red-mill-organic-hard-white-wheat-flour?csrc=GPF-PA-039978008527&ci_sku=039978008527&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw=%7Bkeyword%7D#productDetails

  16. Donna

    First, I want to say thank you for all the work you put into this site. It was exciting to see that good, wholesome gluten free recipes are available, as well as some great treats like these pop-tarts! I think about 75% of my wheat intake has come from Pop-tarts over the past few years – it’s the one addiction I couldn’t give up yet! LOL I’m just beginning down the path to a gluten-free, organic and gmo-free diet. It’s a little daunting at times, but your site does give me hope!
    I also want to applaud your tact & ability to take the higher road. I hope someday I might be able to accomplish that more often. When I read the comment from the woman attacking your intelligence over a type of wheat my heart broke. A few years ago, that could have been me. In that little exchange I saw who I once was like, and the type of reaction I would like to someday accomplish! (I know privately, your reaction may have been different, that’s ok, publicly you represented yourself with grace and dignity! Thank You!

  17. Thanks so much for the gluten free version of this recipe. The things I miss most tend to be “junk foods” and Pop Tarts were one of my main junk vices! I look forward to making these and knowing that A. I won’t get sick and B. they’re much healthier than the store bought tarts. Thanks again for your efforts!

  18. I made two of your recipes in one night! Started with the Waldorf Salad- premade it for dinner- and then my son and I made these pop tarts. They are both FABULOUS! My mom is visiting and has already planned to make the salad twice in the next two weeks. The pop tarts are awesome, too! I might add a touch of sugar to the pastry next time (I know white sugar is a no no, but it’s still about 6000 times better than purchasing an actual pop tart!) and also might use salted butter. This is actually the first pastry I’ve ever made… I find it SO intimidating! But it worked! Thank you so much. My evening has just been terrifically tasty.

Trackbacks

  1. […] My husband loves to eat hard sauce with his pumpkin pie. Unfortunately, due to the extreme processing of the ingredients it would be down-right shameful to post the recipe (it’s a mixture of powdered sugar and amaretto) but I will at least admit that it is eaten in our house on Thanksgiving. It’s fun to have him in the kitchen stirring and tasting for about an hour until it’s just the way he likes it. He puts the bowl in the fridge and then comes in the kitchen every 30 minutes or so to eat another spoonful. I, on the other hand, prefer to eat my pie with a large dollop of whipped cream…and I can post those ingredients.  Print This Recipe Pumpkin Pie Keep in mind that the pie crust recipe makes 2 9-inch crusts. Serves 81 unbaked pie shell (click here for pie crust recipe) […]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *